Primitive Flag

Hi there! With 4th of July upon us it seems to put everyone in the mood for the good ole red, white, and blue. I have always wanted a primitive flag and this year I finally got around to doing something about it.

I started by thinking of what kind of fabric I wanted to make it out of. First thought was muslin of course, but I happened to be in the kitchen section at Walmart and came across a perfect solution. White cotton kitchen towels. And the best part? They come in a package of 2 for under $3.00. I took them home and immediately washed and dried them. They took a little pressing but then they were ready to go.
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I stretched the first towel so I could paint the actual flag on it.I decided on the size 14″x25″. It just seemed to suit my needs. Trying to keep things as simple as possible I used 1″ tape to measure off the red and white stripes. Once they were painted I used a navy blue in the upper left hand corner on which to paint the stars. (tip: I cut a small stencil from poster board to keep the stars simple and regulated).
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Once the painting had dried thoroughly (ideally overnight), I cut the flag out , leaving at least a good inch around it.I also cut out 3 tabs aproximately 3″x8″. I used pinking shears so that I could keep a rough edge. I had some quilt batting laying around, but you could even use an old white towel. Just something to give it a little body. I stiched around the flag wrong sides together, leaving about a 4″ opening and inserting the tabs on the top. I cut a piece of batting just a smidge smaller than the stitching line. With a little maneuvering I slid the batting inside the flag and then stitched up the opening.

I used regular thread and ran sticthes along the stripes and pulled knots through the stars for a quilted effect.
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It was at this time I aged the flag. Remember my friend Karen? I used her instant coffee recipe for aging it. (Karen uses instant coffee. 1cup of water to 1/4cup of instant coffee to be exact.) After it had soaked sufficiently I wrung it out and hung it on a line to dry. It may need a little touching up with an iron to get out any dominant wrinkles, but other than that it is ready to hang. I found a few twigs and pulled them through the tabs and Voila!
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https://www.etsy.com/listing/193993868/handmade-quilted-flag-americana-vintage?ref=shop_home_active_1

I hope everyone has a festive and safe 4th of July this year!
Doris

Chairs Update

Hello! It is gorgeous here in Illinois today! Spring!

I am giving you a teaser as far as the glazing of the chairs. This is a color mix that I came up with that I think will be the final choice. The reason I say that I think that is because I have put some on the chair in one section so that I can make sure the color is right as it dries. I’m thinking it’s going to be just right. 🙂
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This is going a little slower than usual for one of my projects. I am having some distractions that keep interrupting my focus.

Have a good week and I hope you are having a joyful Easter weekend!
Doris

Shabby Chic Bud Vases

You may have seen these around, but did you know how easy they are to create? Simple. First of all you need to get yourself to Goodwill. They usually have a good supply and several styles of bud vases and cheap too.

At your favorite art and craft store you can pick out the colors of paint that you want to use. I used white, pastel pink, blue and green. It doesn’t have to be the kind of paint you use on glass, actually it may be better if it isn’t. I used standard craft paint for mine.
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The main thing is to make sure the vases are clean before you paint them. If they really need it rub them with alchohol to remove any residual dirt.

I put 2 coats of paint on mine using a small craft brush (a foam brush would work as well). Once they have dried thoroughly, usually overnight, they are ready for the next step which is sanding.
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A medium grit sandpaper works best. When sanding the vases you don’t have to sand too hard to get the raised surfaces clear of paint. They should look a little rough, that’s part of the charm. Once I had them sanded I took a look at them and decided I wanted to tone the color down a little and give them a little more of a distressed look. I did this by mixing a little of the white paint with a little glaze medium and brush it on. I immediately wiped the glaze down leaving it to sit in the crevices. Let dry overnight. (You don’t have to buy a whole quart of glaze for the distressing, the craft stores sell small bottles of it in the craft paint aisle.)
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You can use them as individual bud vases or you can do as I have done by putting them in a grouping with an assortment of flowers. They would make a nice addition to an Easter arrangement too!
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Have fun!
Doris
https://www.etsy.com/shop/dcartwork